‘Superior to Edo’ – Sawara Part 1: Kogo Saketen

Sawara 小江戸佐原

On this sunny Saturday in the monsoon season, I headed out to one of the places I have been hoping to check out – the historical town of Sawara in Chiba prefecture. This city was established during Edo period when the samurai class ruled the nation from Edo (Tokyo) as its capital. Sawara was a town without a local warlords, or an autonomous city. Without the ruling class that only consume and do not produce, the city flourished as one of the most important provider for the populated capital down the river. So wealthy that it was described to exceed that of Edo.

As always, I did very little research before going, so as to keep my perception fresh and open. Google Maps gave me pretty inaccurate and confusing directions, taking something like 4 hours plus from my flat. But looking further into it, I found a high-way coach that departs from Yaesu Minami exit of Tokyo terminal, which costs only 1,750 for a non-stop expressway journey into the region in just about 1.5 hours. A few stops after leaving the expressway and passing the Katori shrine, the bus stopped at the centre of the historical area, where I jumped off. The town does not look like it was overly modified for the tourists. Some buildings had relatively new-ish look about them, with fresh kawara roof tiles and fresh white plaster wall, but peeking into the back street around the corner, it looked pretty promising for an authentic experience. Without a visitor guide in my hand, I just zig-zagged the back streets and came back out to the main street, in front of the old liquor warehouse/store. I was looking at the building square-on, trying to decide how I want to frame it, when from the open sliding glass door in the front stepped out the madam of the store, a senior lady, who invited me to come in and have a look inside as well.

Sawara 小江戸佐原

This Kogo Saketen (liquor store) is used to visitors coming by with their cameras all the time, especially with the shop sign carved out of timber, and some more antique-value signs they have hanging inside the shop. The couple are really friendly people and offered me a glass of juice as soon as I walked in. They would tell me a lot of stories about how they are one of the only few store buildings that date back over all years – the city was mostly destroyed by the fire on the 25th year of Meiji (1892 AD) and some of the old buildings currently standing date back to the reconstruction after the fire. More recently the massive quake that hit the Eastern Japan dropped roof tiles (kawara tiles) and destroyed facade of some of those traditional architecture, which explains the new-ish look of the town when you walk by. This liquor store was a wholesale business, and those antique signs hanging inside with various liquor brand logos were the kind only authorised retailers of those drinks have after the signs were made and given to them by the liquor brands. They also used to make miso paste in a warehouse in the back, and the master remembers being a young man in his early teenager how the military would send young men to their factory, take plenty of miso they made there with them, into the base they didn’t know exactly where. The landing of the American forces were considered imminent and the military were preparing for it. Young students before the age of joining the military, like himself back then, would be collected to dig trenches behind the shore line in the darkness of the night. Now one of the only handful of really old business in town, the town’s office and history-obsessed academic students who come to town would ask them to keep the business going, instead of turning the old building into a history museum like similar businesses in other historical towns across the country do. For them who would call other 75-year-old liquor business owner ‘young’, it is no longer a practical business, and they only operate in a very small scale. They are happy to wake up and open up the shop to the public every day; they feel that would keep their mind clear. But delivering those heavy carton of drinks is not a realistic option for them now.

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

They were one of the few authorised retailer for Asahi Beer (formerly Sakura Beer). The old photo on the wall shows the front of the shop with a big Sakura Beer sign (I’m sure carved out of premium timber!), with more than a dozen staff standing around. The current master in front of me is the baby held in the arms of the man in the centre. In the same frame is another photo of a warehouse where they used to make miso paste. Asahi was not a popular choice when it comes to beer in Kirin-dominated market for a long time. How times have changed.

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

College kid from this region brought a few local high-school kids to hear the story of the couple who have lived through the war years.

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

They still sell miso by weight. This was how miso was sold for generations, but now everyone buys plastic-packed portions at supermarket. Just the other day some famous actors came with TV crew to interview them. I bought some, too, of course.

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Sawara 小江戸佐原

Tiger Calculator is a manually controlled billing typing machine of a sort. The lady has been using it for over 3 decades and it is still what she uses to finish her book.

Sawara 小京都佐原

This art-deco or whatever retro looking cash register has a number display at the top. That’s right – this is an electronic cash register, the kind that used to be at every shop front before the POS system, just having a fancy skin on it. It is an American product, and they show me an envelope with ‘NCR’ logo, full of English and translated user manuals. Initially she was a bit embarrassed about this and placed this behind a wall so it won’t be seen by many customers, but occasionally people would ask if they’re selling this. It can even work out the 8% GST. Easy!

Sawara 小京都佐原

This was my first visit to this historical town of Sawara. But I was immediately at home with lovely people talking to me. The town will host the first of early-summer festivals from the 10th to the 12th. Perhaps I could book a bed in a traditional ryokan hotel and enjoy the quiet street after dark and the view to the main street in the morning mist. Maybe…

Sunny weekend between the rains in Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

I haven been rather lazy with my blog updates of late. I’ve been posting my photos from overseas trips on my travel blog as well as the facebook page. I got up on Sunday morning and decided I wanted to sit in a temple and look out to a view to the garden. I would know where I might find one in Kyoto, but here in Tokyo, I am still a little lost. Half an hour of playing with iPhone and I decided that Kamakura may have the best chance for what I was after. Quickly packing a couple of Fuji’s and a tripod, I walked to the train station. Kamakura turned out to be a very popular destination, especially now in the monsoon season when the flowers bloom around town.

The temple I was hoping to see was not open to public today due to some irregular maintenance work. Nearby at Kenchoji temple I came across this display of flower arrangements and spoke to the senior lady who is the teacher of the group. She kindly allowed me to photograph her works. Soon I was seeking permission to move the display tables around, opening screen doors to let in more light. I couldn’t say I had the most appropriate gear for this kind of setup, but when you are given a situation with limited equipment, you improvise.

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

They had another of such self-standing screen with calligraphy works; that became my white bounce to let in some more light around the side of the flower work. That was fun!

I said thanks to the flower teacher and this young lady for letting me photograph her up close while she was making tea for the guests, and I was on my way.

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

鎌倉 Kamakura

It is a town with plenty of history. The first shogunate government was formed in this town back in 1192, I learned in history class. There are signs of rich culture and the religion that went with the rise and fall of those families. I’ve only been here a few times but I feel there is so much to discover about Kamakura and certainly capture in my photographs in different times of year.

Spring time

Yokosuka

It’s been pretty busy winter but as it got a little warmer, I started photographing again. Yokosuka Navy Base was open to the public on their spring open day, but I skipped the long queue and walked around town. What is there to see? It is just a base right? Yokosuka itself is an interesting town.

Yokosuka

Yokosuka

Yokosuka

I also checked out the cherry blossom for the first time in many years. When was the last time I was in Japan in spring time?

Sakura

Sakura

Sakura

Sakura

Sakura by night

In the evening, towards the end of that week-long cherry blossom period, the petals blown away in the wind covered the surface of the river.

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Just stepping out, not more than 10-minute walk away. But grab a camera anyway. It is there, waiting for you. The visual inspiration, the thing that touches on your string somewhere, the shock of the contrast, the beautiful melody of flowing movement, or just a cold statement of what it is. So grab a camera. Always have it handy with you. Doesn’t matter if you came home without a single shot clicked. It is also ok you take 200 frames and find none of them was presentable. The main thing is that your partner is always there with you. Your right hand holding the grip. It is enough to make sure your mind’s eye is open, aware or even looking for, things that you respond to. And when it does, stop your pace and look. What was that, just now? What did I see? Why did I feel something? See if you can condense it down to the crystal of it.

So I was just heading out for a hair-cut before going home to see my family in the other part of the country for the new year’s. It is a short walk to the hair salon. But I would be walking through this park next to my flat. OK, why not?

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Reminder of the season passed

Sure autumn is long gone. I have leather gloves on even when I’m shooting. The beanie keeps my head under freshly trimmed hair warm. I am surprised so much autumn is still in town on the last days of the year. Maybe it was a bit of bonus to me after working long hours throughout the year. Well done, I kept a bit of autumn aside for you to remember. It is the favourite season of yours, it is the season you were born in. It is yours. For a moment I felt something was telling me that. That’s why I brought my camera up to my eye, to remember what struck me.

Happy new year, everyone! Grab your camera, keep your eyes open. The world is full of amazing inspirations.

Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Art Museum

Just looking for a place to kill the time for half the Sunday, I looked up Tokyo Art Beat for some ideas. This one came up, a former residence of a royal, full of Art Deco details. Unfortunately photography inside the building was not allowed on the weekend as it will block up the visitors’ path. Shame. It sure is a beautiful building. You got to check it out. 700 yen admission. Most photos are details taken from my table in the cafe. Still pretty good!

東京都庭園美術館

東京都庭園美術館

東京都庭園美術館

東京都庭園美術館

東京都庭園美術館

東京都庭園美術館

東京都庭園美術館

Check out some pretty images of the Art Deco building, and their hours on their website.
http://www.teien-art-museum.ne.jp/special/

(Update)
8 Dec: Fixed the typo in the title.

Autumn rain

Autumn rain

I was away in Taiwan last weekend, so this is really the first time I decided to take on the beauty of autumn in Japan for the first time in ages. While taking it slow on my Saturday morning processing photos and updating my travel blog, it started to rain softly. I took my camera out and walked in the park just next to the flat.

(more…)

Shonan

It was about to become another lazy weekend which I was not going to get much out of. In the early afternoon on Sunday, I packed my camera in the bag and headed for the train station. Switching trains, and onto the tram by the sea, I walked in the seabreeze, a milvus’ familiar voice as it circles over head, to the break of waves in Shonan.

湘南
 
湘南
 
湘南
 
湘南
 
湘南
 
湘南
 
Instead of crossing to the big island of Enoshima, I walked along the beach, towards Koshigoe.

湘南
 
湘南
 
湘南
 
湘南

And again onto the tram, then off at Hase. Walking rather aimlessly, I came up towards the temple where the large sitting Buddha is on the hill. But the gate was already closed, it got very dark towards 5pm and it started to drizzle. Not that I was particularly keen on seeing the statue again, but it was more like a mandatory stop in this touristy region.

The red tail lights of the car fades into the dusk. The sea reflects the smooth cloudy sky. I can’t help noticing the influence the exhibition by Michael Kenna has had on me since hearing him talk of his works last weekend. I even brought a tripod with me in readiness of taking some long exposure shots of the landscape. Maybe I can come back on a rainy day. Even better still, maybe I should get myself another roadster, drive down the coastline to here, and either tram or bring out a folding bicycle, to cover the area for the day. Yeah, maybe…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 57 other followers